Beer Made From 45-Million-Year-Old Yeast

In 1995, Raul Cano, a 63-year-old microbiologist at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, discovered a fossil containing a variant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, known in culinary circles as baker's or brewer's yeast. The microorganisms had lain dormant since the Eocene epoch, a time when Australia split off from Antarctica and modern mammals first appeared.

Cano was able to take this ancient yeast and "re-awaken" it from it's dormant state. He then used the yeast to make a good old fashion ale: Fossil Fuels ale.

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"In an infinite fractal of rotation, how do you define the center? Every point is the center. You are the center of the universe observing the universe from your very own center. Wherever you pick a point of observation in the fractal, that point becomes the center from which you're observing the universe. That point becomes stillness. Why stillness? Because in that point now, all the spins of the universe cancel out.… You need stillness to have a frame of reference for rotation… And that's how singularity occurs. Singularity is the point at the center of your experience of the universe, that is the point of stillness from which you're observing the universe."

-Nassim Haramein
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"There is a physical place inside your heart that has a singularity. Your heart has a little cavity between the two ventricular, and that little cavity has the highest electromagnetic field of your body, and can be measured up to eight feet away from you; and that's the battery of life that keeps your heart going. When you die, that singularity is no longer present, and I think that is why there is a bunch of weight that goes missing when people die. The weight is the result of that singularity curving space-time, creating a gravitational effect that we call weight."

- Nassim Haramein